For today I am a boy / Kim Fu.

Nā: Fu, Kim [author.].
Momo rauemi: materialTypeLabelPukapukaWhakaahuatanga: xiii, 241 pages ; 24 cm.ISBN: 9781742758169.Ngā marau: Brothers and sisters -- Fiction | Fathers and sons -- Fiction | Chinese -- Canada -- Fiction | Gender identity -- FictionGenre/Form: Psychological fiction. | Bildungsromans.DDC classification: 813.6
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Fiction FU (Tirotirohia te whatanga) Wātea
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Ngā whakaahuatanga whakarei nā Syndetics:

" Winner, Edmund White Prize for Debut Fiction. PEN/Hemingway Finalist, shortlisted in the Lambda Literary Awards. Longlisted for the 2014 Flaherty-Dunnan First Novel Prize. Finding one's place in the world can be hard, but sometimes even more elusive, is finding where you fit in your family. Peter Huang and his sisters elegant Adele, shrewd Helen, and Bonnie the bon vivant grow up in a house of many secrets, then escape the confines of small-town Ontario and spread from Montreal to California to Berlin. Peter's own journey is obstructed by playground bullies, masochistic lovers, Christian ex-gays, and the ever-present shadow of his Chinese father. At birth, Peter had been given the Chinese name juan chaun , powerful king. The exalted only son in the middle of three daughters, Peter was the one who would finally embody his immigrant father's ideal of power and masculinity. But Peter has different dreams: he is certain he is a girl. Drawing comparisons from Jeffrey Eugenides' Middlesex to the work of Amy Tan. Sensitive, witty, and stunningly assured, Kim Fu's debut novel lays bare the costs of forsaking one's own path in defer

At foot of title: Vintage Books Australia.

First published in the United States by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company in 2014. First published in Australia by Vintage in 2014.

Ngā arotake i whakaratohia e Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Peter Huang is born to Chinese immigrant parents in small-town Ontario in 1979 as the long-awaited boy in a household of girls. His father, eager to shed all vestiges of Chinese language and culture, speaks his last words in Cantonese after Peter's birth, assigning his newborn son the -unofficial moniker Juan Chuan, or "Powerful King." Peter's father holds to strictly traditional ideas about gender and is uncomfortable with his son's reluctance to embrace conventionally masculine pursuits as well as his close association with his sisters. For his part, Peter wants nothing more than to emulate his beautiful, alluring oldest sister, Adele. Emotionally stunted by the disapproval of both his father and society at large and growing up in a home where such things are never discussed, Peter is very slow to realize that his long-repressed dream is attainable. VERDICT In this impressive debut, Fu sensitively and poetically portrays Peter's predicament so that readers feel his discomfort with his own body as well as his painful sense of yearning and the plight of his three sisters, who scatter in all directions to escape their unhappy home. [See Prepub Alert, 7/8/13.]-Lauren Gilbert, -Sachem P.L., Holbrook, NY (c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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